About: coastpostadmin2

Follower of Gutenberg, world affairs and the golden rule. Providing digital publishing tools and information to digital publishers creating new value through change. Also, providing news and information to the California coastal community.

Recent Posts by coastpostadmin2

Long Beach’s floating Christmas trees-a 69-year tradition

Christmas trees on Alamitos Bay

Tim Grobaty, Long Beach Post 11/22/2018

More than 60 of the 16-foot trees on 8-by-8-foot bases have sprouted up over the 69 years. Now you can spot them in the Colorado Lagoon, Heartwell, Scherer and El Dorado park lakes, Rainbow Lagoon and Harbor, and Spinnaker Bay, as well as in the initial spots of Alamitos Bay and Naples Canal—pretty much anywhere you’ll find water, you’ll find colorful trees growing in it when the Christmas season begins, which, in the case of the Trees on the Bay, is at dusk on Thanksgiving evening. The trees are lit every night through New Year’s Day.

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Wind Farm on the California Coast? update

The first informational meeting took place in Morro Bay in 2015. After a pause caused by the U.S. Navy the initiative is inching forward. The timing is interesting considering PG&E has since announces the shutdown of the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. While the potential output is likely not the same the wind farm can plug into the current power grid out of both Morro Bay and Diablo Canyon. It seems to have the capacity to power all households in San Luis Obispo County and then some. Also, new jobs may approximate jobs lost although it remains to be seen at what income level. Here is the local article from NBC affiliate KSBY kicking off the community feedback process.

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Desalination advances in California

By Paul Rogers, progers@bayareanewsgroup.com, Bay Area News Group 1/30/2018 California water officials have approved $34.4 million in grants to eight desalination projects across the state, including one in Antioch, as part of an effort to boost the water supply in the wake of the state’s historic, five-year drought. The money comes from Proposition 1, a water bond passed by state voters in November 2014 during the depths of the drought, and it highlights a new trend in purifying salty water for human consumption: only one of the projects is dependent on the ocean. Instead, six of the winning proposals are for brackish desalination and one is for research at the University of Southern California. In brackish desalination, salty water from a river, bay or underground aquifer is filtered for drinking, rather than taking ocean water, which is often up to three times saltier and more expensive to purify. Complete article here  ...
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Wind Farm On California Coast?

Apparently as controversial as oil drilling and nuclear power, a proposal to explore a  project to harvest plentiful ocean wind has been halted for now by the navy. Those of us who live, play, work and visit the coast also use electricity. The messaging by leadership and opposition is confusing. We use increasing amounts of electricity yet the opposition seems to argue against every project (oil, nuclear, wind) including solar in the desert. Does it simply come down to profiteers who will always advocate for the source of their revenue against environmentalist who are energy users but say no to everything? It will be fascinating to go out another generation (twenty years) to see which direction West Coasters decide on. Plenty of drama is in store with this story! Read the New Times article about this restriction here: A summary of the Trident Morro Bay project as presented by Trident is here. A fair amount written in recent media has...
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California’s lost coast

By MICHAEL MCCARTHY, Vancouver Sun Published on: November 28, 2016 | Last Updated: November 28, 2016 10:45 AM PST California teems with over 38 million people and it seems every square inch of land is packed. Not so. The Lost Coast is virtually empty and there are good reasons for that. Just finding the Lost Coast can be a puzzle. If you look on your map, it’s the area of land jutting out into the Pacific near the northern end of the state, the most westerly piece of land in America. Until recently, the only way to approach the phenomenally beautiful coast was from the town of Eureka near Oregon, driving south to the hamlet of Petrolia and then trekking way out to the coast. Why is it “lost?” First off, there’s the fog. This section of extremely rugged coast is frequently lost in mist. Many ships have sunk here. There are no roads, towns or villages and...
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